Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
MSNBCW 6
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> sarah, our resident religion expert at the table, you have a religious unpopular -- >> i have a related unpopular opinion to sahil's, which is that politicians should stop talking about religion, god and the bible. >> so -- >> people would be less -- public polly would icy would be less on -- >> why is in no safe zone in politics? >> 20% of the american public is not affiliated with a particular religion. there is a smaller segment of those who are atheist than agnostic. still, as he points out, it is kind of amazing that given the rise in the number of american atheists and nonbelievers there is not a single one in the u.s. congress and that it would be poison to run and openly declare you're an atheist. look at mark pryor's ad where he talked about the bible and he doesn't have all the answers, only god has all the answers. it is, like, well, if you don't have answers, why are you running for office? >> but flip it around, though. there has to be some -- to an elected official who sincerely believes in higher power, practices their faith, there has to be some civic value in that too,
who haven't made it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper. some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world. and to future generations. you know, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet. but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs, and we're rugged individuals. that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think i'm not going to be held back
it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper. some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world. and to future generations. you know, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet. but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my sweepeech yesterday, we live in a economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs, and we're rugged individuals. that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think i'm not going to be held back by conventions and traditions. i
responsibility to look at how people have made it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper, some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world and to future generations. and i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a marked economy that is the greatest generation of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs and we're rugged individualists and that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think, you know
islam a as a great religion while at the same time seeing no contradiction in denouncing, opposing and rallying the nation to fight the we accelerated branch of islam -- perverted branch of islam which attacked us so wantonly on nerve. i wrote at the time and i believe to this day that history will treat you like harry truman, recognizing the depths of your achievement and creating the very infrastructure that will carry us through this war on barbarism. we are already seeing in this today in a kind of backhanded tribute to you as those who so criticized you during those eight years, the very people who did criticize you in those eight years when they came to power, they adopted the very same tools that you bequeathed to them, and that you and your administration had created in a moment of national confusion and danger. just as truman did in his day, providing the infrastructure, the tools and the institutions that carried us through the cold war in those days and will carry us through this war. in this generation. and if i can just repeat what i said to you in private, but i'd lik
, intersection of religion and politics, different side of our president and a lot of folks get to see. sometimes we see him as an avatar on our television screens, in the white house press briefing room or giving a speech. i have gotten to know him as the man who has vulnerabilities, is compassionate, has his own flaws but at the end of the day is a decent human being and been able to show a little bit of that side of him in the book in "the president's devotional". i would like to read a little bit of it for you. give you a taste of what some of the devotionals are about and open up too a couple questions and sign some books. one of the themes i often came back to in "the president's devotional" is really helping the president find a sense of joy and laughter and gladness in the midst of some difficult and deep and serious times. he is a pretty serious guy himself and i wanted to use the devotional to allow him to release a little bit and get to a place of joy. to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free silhouetted by the sea circled by the circumstances, with all memory and fai
out of hand. you would not dismiss religion out of hand. religion has nothing to do with science, but it is something people believe very deeply. you have scientists arguing that the foods are safe and acceptable. on the other hand, you have people arguing on other grounds that even if the foods are safe -- and they are not willing to accept that they are -- but even if the foods are safe, they are not acceptable on other grounds. these two points of view go past each other with no meeting of the minds whatsoever. the academy was giving a vote to science-based look into genetically modified foods to say they are ok. other people would argue differently. would think labeling solve a lot of these problems than they should have been labeled from the beginning. let me say one other thing about that. the first company that was going to develop a genetically modified food was working on a gmo tomato. i have in my files at nyu copies of the label they intended to use on those products. a great big tomato with genetic modifications was right on the front saying this is the pride of calif
that jerusalem, the crucible of the world's three great monotheistic religions becomes non-not as the subject of constant struggle, but as the golden city of peace and unity embodied the aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. peace is possible because we have courageous leaders who have already taken significant political risks for peace. the time is approaching when they will have to take even more . they have shown real courage, nd primesident abbas a minister netanyahu. the president has made tough choices. he has stayed the course, despite people in his team saying you ought to get out of here, look at those settlements, they are making a full of you. leave me, that battle has been going on. i deal with it every week. time, there has been israeli soldiers shot and killed and other actsk of incitement. prime minister netanyahu has made tough choices. just this week, he reaffirmed his commitment to a palestinian state. he said israel is ready for an historic peace. because possible today the arab league has also made tough choices. for the first time, they came to washington. they
of the parliamentarians, they religion against their to actually have a nuclear weapon. it's not like there hasn't been a debate within iran itself in regards to nuclear weapons program. it's not like all of iranians have said they want to move forward with nuclear weapons. they have been divided with their own society. they have that constant debate themselves. i think the iranian people made a choice when they decided to elect a more moderate president this time than they had previously. and so part of the voices of the tonian people are starting stare up also. they want to -- my hope is, and we will see whether or not they abide by the agreement and move forward, but my hope is that they would want to be a part of the international community. they cannot be part of the international community if in fact they have a nuclear weapon. as i said, it is important that russia and china has a stake in is also because here are individual countries who previously had not had a stake in this. important for them to have this p5+1 come together. if iran really wants to get back to the international committee, th
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)